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The Smart Girl's Guide to Going Vegetarian
Cover of The Smart Girl's Guide to Going Vegetarian
The Smart Girl's Guide to Going Vegetarian
How to Look Great, Feel Fabulous, and Be a Better You
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What would you love. Love what you eat. No labels. No fuss. It's not about what you call yourself—it's about how you feel. Whether you're going vegan, vegetarian, fish-only, chicken-only, or all...
What would you love. Love what you eat. No labels. No fuss. It's not about what you call yourself—it's about how you feel. Whether you're going vegan, vegetarian, fish-only, chicken-only, or all...
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Description-

  • What would you love. Love what you eat.

    No labels. No fuss. It's not about what you call yourself—it's about how you feel. Whether you're going vegan, vegetarian, fish-only, chicken-only, or all veggies except grandma's famous pigs-in-a-blanket, this book is your new best friend.

    Eating less meat can boost your energy, help you lose weight, and it's better for the environment. If you're looking to cut down on meat or cut it out completely, here you'll find awesome advice and the answers you need to make it work for you.

    Get the Scoop On:

  • Daily meal ideas and easy recipes even your non-veggie friends will want to try
  • How to convince your family this isn't just a fad or a phase
  • Finding good food when you're away from home: veggie-friendly restaurants, colleges, and travel spots
  • Getting enough iron, protein, and other vital nutrients to be healthy (because being vegetarian does NOT mean a diet of ice cream and pasta)
  • Sneaky meaty things that can end up in food that seems perfectly safe for vegetarians

Excerpts-

  • From the book

    Introduction

    Dear Readers:

    When I was twelve years old, I became a vegetarian. A cruddy one. A vegetarian who ate rice for dinner and thought it was perfectly OK to order french fries for lunch when my friends were getting burgers. As a result of my less-than-stellar food choices, I constantly battled low energy and had a handful of pounds to lose and a lot of frustration over constant questioning from adults about my eating habits.

    I never really liked meat, to be honest-many of my early memories involve choking down some form of beef or chicken so I could justify eating the french fries (again, those fries!), tater tots, or baked potato that came with it. So that made it easy to entertain the idea of giving up meat entirely. But cutting it out of my diet didn't happen overnight.

    The next thing that got me thinking about saying so long to meat was my affection for animals. I loved animals. Still do-just ask anyone who knows me how often I talk about my beagle Penny. As a young kid, I owned countless fish and gerbils. Many of my birthday parties were at science museums and environmental centers and involved petting rabbits, snakes, and other wildlife. As I got older, I started to put the pieces together-that chicken comes from, well, chicken. That steak is just a friendlier way of saying cow. I didn't like it one bit. That taste of meat that I already didn't love grew even worse in my mouth.

    The final straw on my road to vegetarianism was as simple as this: my parents bought new leather couches. I was horrified. "You're going to make me sit on a cow?!," I exclaimed. "That's it!" my mother said. "I'm sick of this! You want to save the animals when it's good for you, but when you're in the mood for a hamburger, it all goes out the window!" She was right. I hated when my mother was right. But little did she know, I was never really all that into those burgers, anyway (I still really just wanted the fries!). "I'm never going to eat a hamburger again," I proclaimed.

    My parents still have the leather couches. And I still haven't eaten a hamburger.

    Since that middle school declaration, I've gone on to high school, to college to be a writer, and to graduate school to be a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN). While it's been no shock that I've met a lot of other vegetarians along the way, one thing that surprised me is how many have a similar story to mine. Most all of the vegetarians I encounter stopped eating meat when they were somewhere around middle school or high school. And most of them, like me, played around with the idea of vegetarianism-going vegan and then adding back in dairy, giving up red meat first and then chicken and fish, for instance-before they settled on the degree that felt right to them (for the record, as an adult I started eating some fish, which I continue to do today). I've also met a lot of adults who mention that even though they eat meat now, they didn't for a couple of years during middle or high school.

    In my work as a nutritionist, I cross paths with a lot of teenagers who are what I like to call "veg-curious"-they're thinking about giving up meat, but aren't quite sure what their particular brand of vegetarianism is going to look like. Or they're confident about what type of vegetarian they want to be, but are struggling with how to do so healthfully or how to convince the adults in their life that this is a good idea. I'm always looking for books, websites, and other resources that I can recommend to my clients. But when I started looking for a place to send what I call my "VegHeads,"-the huge number of teens and...

Table of Contents-

  • Introduction

    CHAPTER 1: How Veg is Your Head?

    CHAPTER 2: Myths and Realities about Going Vegetarian

    CHAPTER 3: Paths to Veg

    CHAPTER 4: Nutrition for Veggies

    CHAPTER 5: Building Your Vegetarian Meal

    CHAPTER 6: Sneaky Sources of Meat, Dairy, and More

    CHAPTER 7: Eat Out, Veggie!

    CHAPTER 8: Veggie Voyager

    CHAPTER 9: Really Cool Resources

    CHAPTER 10: Get Cookin', VegHead Style

    Acknowledgments

    About the Author

Reviews-

  • Publisher's Weekly

    October 28, 2013
    Nutritionist and educator Warren lays out a realistic, accessible, and enriching plan for readers in the beginning stages of embracing vegetarianism or other diets, from vegan to “ethical carnivore.” Ten handbook-style chapters explore dietary choice, addressing myths about being vegetarian (such as “Vegetarian diets are way healthier than omnivorous ones”), the nutritional makeup of veggies and other vegetarian foods, and tips for cooking and choosing meals when eating in or out. Those who aren’t set on giving up meat products entirely but want to improve their health through creative and informed eating will also benefit from Warren’s nuanced approach, which emphasizes the importance of eating according to one’s personal values over any prescribed notions. Recipes and additional resources are included. Ages 12–up. Agent: Danielle Chiotti, Upstart Crow Literary.

  • Kirkus

    November 15, 2013
    Detailed yet concise, this guide to vegetarianism encompasses a broad range of possible choices for teens interested in adopting plant-based diets. From going completely vegan to simply eating meat that is produced relatively ethically, nutritionist Warren breezily suggests that teens take her short quiz to determine what eating style works best for them. She addresses her audience directly and offers a bit of her own background, including a decision to become a vegetarian as a teen that resulted in less-than-optimal nutrition due to a tendency to view French fries and rice as foods around which to center her diet. The guide is particularly useful in the care it takes in elucidating the myriad terms that exist in labeling food, the breakdown of what foods are good for vegans and lacto-ovo vegetarians at ethnic and chain restaurants, and the potential pitfall of an animal product showing up in food where it would be least expected (fish sauce in "vegetarian" pad Thai; anchovies in Caesar salad). Warren also provides plenty of information on optimal vegetarian nutrition, veg-friendly colleges, online resources, as well as easy recipes and practical but polite ways to talk with adults about eschewing meat. An upbeat, informative resource that will come in handy for many a teen--a shame that teen boys will almost certainly avoid it due to the title. (Nonfiction. 12 & up)

    COPYRIGHT(2013) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • School Library Journal

    February 1, 2014

    Gr 9 Up-With a friendly tone and a ton of nutritional information, this guide will be easy for teenagers to digest. Warren's explanations of the various ways to go veg is neither preachy nor threatening. In fact, she encourages readers who are considering changing their diet to begin by participating in Meatless Mondays. Chapters include information on nutrients that are crucial to a healthy diet and what foods they can be found in for all types of diets (vegan, lacto-ovo, pescetarian). The book also includes types of restaurants with vegetarian-friendly options and an explanation of how to use the choosemyplate.gov resource to practice planning a healthy meal when cooking at home. As in most cookbooks, some of the recipes call for obscure ingredients. The best parts of this title include the author's philosophy that every person has the right to eat according to her own personal values, a section debunking myths about going vegetarian, and what a young adult should say to her parents if they are questioning her dietary choices. Unfortunately, this great resource will not be picked up by teenage boys simply because of the title.-Lindsay Klemas, JM Rapport School for Career Development, Bronx, NY

    Copyright 2014 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

  • Booklist

    February 15, 2014
    Grades 8-12 A vegetarian herself since age 12, Warren knows the questions that teen girls ask and the arguments their parents raise when kids want to experience vegetarianism or veganism. Here, she offers sound advice for girls who are considering being or have chosen to go vegetarian or vegan and for those who waver about where they stand on the topic. She emphasizes the importance of balanced nutrition and takes girls through ways to include each nutritional element, vitamin, or mineral in their meal plan. Among the questions she addresses: How does a teen girl make wise choices in a school cafeteria? Or should one pack a lunch? When eating out, how can one make sure that no meat is lurking in what appears to be meat-free? She includes tips for finding restaurants when traveling; quality vegetarian organizations and related websites; and simple-to-make, appealing veggie recipes. The catchy, accessible text is broken up by generous topic headings and questions. Overall, a sound guide for any teenager, really, and her or his parents.(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 2014, American Library Association.)

  • Parents.com, Mom Must Read "As a part-time vegetarian–I'd be full-time if the whole family just would get on board and pepperoni would stop existing–I find Rachel's advice super helpful."
  • Wilmington Star-News "The timing's never been better for a well researched book on the subject specifically targeted to that audience. Rachel Meltzer Warren, a professional nutritionist and former 12-year-old vegetarian herself, has compiled a 200-page paperback crammed with useful information."
  • School Library Journal "With a friendly tone and a ton of nutritional information, this guide will be easy for teenagers to digest."
  • Bookworm Sez "Looking for a basic intro to eliminating meat from your diet? You'll find it in 'The Smart Girl's Guide to Going Vegetarian' ... It's got humor, nutritional information, tips, and encouragement"
  • Chicago Tribune "If you're a teen girl facing skeptical parents, busy schedules, limited cafeteria eats and changing nutritional needs, then let 'The Smart Girl's Guide to Going Vegetarian' be your GPS. Author and registered dietitian nutritionist Rachel Meltzer Warren packs this paperback with information"

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The Smart Girl's Guide to Going Vegetarian
How to Look Great, Feel Fabulous, and Be a Better You
Rachel Meltzer Warren
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How to Look Great, Feel Fabulous, and Be a Better You
Rachel Meltzer Warren
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