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Quiet Power
Cover of Quiet Power
Quiet Power
The Secret Strengths of Introverts
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The monumental bestseller Quiet has been recast in a new edition that empowers introverted kids and teens  Susan Cain sparked a worldwide conversation when she published Quiet: The Power of...
The monumental bestseller Quiet has been recast in a new edition that empowers introverted kids and teens  Susan Cain sparked a worldwide conversation when she published Quiet: The Power of...
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Description-

  • The monumental bestseller Quiet has been recast in a new edition that empowers introverted kids and teens 

    Susan Cain sparked a worldwide conversation when she published Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. With her inspiring book, she permanently changed the way we see introverts and the way introverts see themselves.

    The original book focused on the workplace, and Susan realized that a version for and about kids was also badly needed. This book is all about kids' world—school, extracurriculars, family life, and friendship. You’ll read about actual kids who have tackled the challenges of not being extroverted and who have made a mark in their own quiet way. You’ll hear Susan Cain’s own story, and you’ll be able to make use of the tips at the end of each chapter. There’s even a guide at the end of the book for parents and teachers.

    This insightful, accessible, and empowering book, illustrated with amusing comic-style art, will be eye-opening to extroverts and introverts alike.

Excerpts-

  • From the book

    Chapter One

    Quiet in the Cafeteria

    When I was nine years old, I convinced my parents to let me go to summer camp for eight weeks. My parents were skeptical, but I couldn’t wait to get there. I’d read lots of novels set at summer camps on wooded lakes, and it sounded like so much fun.

    Before I left, my mother helped me pack a suitcase full of shorts, sandals, swimsuits, towels, and . . . books. Lots and lots and lots of books. This made perfect sense to us; reading was a group activity in our family. At night and on weekends, my parents, siblings, and I would all sit around the living room and disappear into our novels. There wasn’t much talking. Each of us would follow our own fictional adventures, but in our way we were sharing this time together. So when my mother packed me all those novels, I pictured the same kind of experience at camp, only better. I could see myself and all my new friends in our cabin: ten girls in matching nightgowns reading together happily.

    But I was in for a big surprise. Summer camp turned out to be the exact opposite of quiet time with my family. It was more like one long, raucous birthday party—and I couldn’t even phone my parents to take me home.

    On the very first day of camp, our counselor gathered us together. In the name of camp spirit, she said, she would demonstrate a cheer that we were to perform every day for the rest of the summer. Pumping her arms at her sides as if she were jogging, the counselor chanted:

    “R-O-W-D-I-E,

    THAT’S THE WAY

    WE SPELL ROWDY,

    ROWDIE! ROWDIE!

    LET’S GET ROWDIE!”

    She finished with both her hands up, palms out, and a huge smile on her face.

    Okay, this was not what I was expecting. I was already excited to be at camp—why the need to be so outwardly rowdy? (And why did we have to spell this word incorrectly?!) I wasn’t sure what to think. Gamely I performed the cheer—and then found some downtime to pull out one of my books and start reading.

    Later that week, though, the coolest girl in the bunk asked me why I was always reading and why I was so “mellow”—mellow being the opposite of R-O-W-D-I-E. I looked down at the book in my hand, then around the bunk. No one else was sitting by herself, reading. They were all laughing and playing hand games, or running around in the grass outside with kids from other bunks. So I closed my book and put it away, along with all the others, in my suitcase. I felt guilty as I tucked the books under my bed, as if they needed me and I was letting them down.

    For the rest of the summer, I shouted out the ROWDIE cheer with as much enthusiasm as I could muster. Every day I pumped my arms and smiled wide, doing my best approximation of a lively, gregarious camper. And when camp was over and I finally reunited with my books, something felt different. It felt as if, at school and even with my friends, that pressure to be rowdy still loomed large.

    In elementary school, I’d known everyone since kindergarten. I knew I was shy deep down, but I felt very comfortable and had even starred in the school play one year. Everything changed in middle school, though, when I switched to a new school system where I didn’t know anyone. I was the new kid in a sea of chattering strangers. My mom would drive me to school because being on a bus with dozens of other kids was too overwhelming. The doors to the school stayed locked until the first bell, and when I arrived early I’d have to wait outside in the parking lot, where groups of friends huddled together. They all seemed to know...

Reviews-

  • Kirkus

    April 1, 2016
    The author of the bestselling Quiet (2012) collaborates with Mone and Moroz to bring her message of empowerment for quiet types to teen readers. Cain opens by placing introverts on "what's called a spectrum" (an infelicitous term, considering its more common usage in psychology) with extroverts on the opposite end and vaguely defined "ambiverts" in the middle. She goes on to draw from her own experiences as well as those of psychologists and a dozen or so first-name-only teens to affirm that there's nothing abnormal about preferring to work alone rather than in groups, thinking before speaking, being "differently social," and needing a place to unwind in solitude. Along with assuring less outgoing readers that they have plenty of company, from Einstein to Beyonce, she discusses distinctive "superpowers" that introverts can employ--specifically at school and in managing peer relationships--either for their own comfort or as coping mechanisms for public speaking and like stress producers. In her view "introverted" is not the same as "shy," but these techniques will be equally useful to both sorts of readers. For those with short attention spans she closes each chapter with summary lists of points and behavioral tools (for those with even shorter ones, Web cartoonist Snider converts many to visual form), and she goes on in a pair of afterwords to provide guidelines for parents and make a case against forced participation in classroom discussions. Standard-issue self-help: worthy enough but wordy and heavily earnest, addressed to a broad audience but unlikely to attract one. (notes, index) (Nonfiction. 13-17)

    COPYRIGHT(2016) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • School Library Journal

    Starred review from May 1, 2016

    Gr 6 Up-Cain is well known for her adult book and TED Talk on the contributions that introverts have made to society in a world that seems powered by extroverts. In this edition, she addresses the challenges that young introverts face. Unfortunately for introverts, who make up one-third to half the population, those who often seem to thrive most in school or public situations are the extroverts. Cain believes that introverts, like her, can learn to use their "superpowers" (namely: listening, deep thinking, and focusing on the self) to flourish. The book is divided into chapters based on school, socializing, hobbies, and home, with firsthand accounts of introverted teens and examples of famous figures (e.g., Beyonce, Albert Einstein) who have found success outside of their initial comfort zones. Included are strategies and tips on how introverts can overcome situations that prove difficult for them (preparing notes to enter class discussions, establishing a time limit for social outings, setting up a personal sanctuary). Humorous drawings throughout the text add a whimsical and light touch perfect for the intended audience. This highly accessible volume gives a voice to a group of people who are often made to feel unappreciated. There is no index, but the work does include notes, an afterword for teachers, and a guide for parents.

    Copyright 2016 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

  • Booklist

    May 1, 2016
    Grades 5-8 The author of the adult best-seller Quiet (2012) brings her introvert revolution to tweens and teens in this thought-provoking guide. Cain begins by defining introverts and extroverts, before questioning the Extrovert Ideal, in which society idolizes talkers and spotlight seekers. The text is divided into four typical settings in which introverts must interact with others: school, socializing, hobbies, and home. Chapters within these sections feature brief profiles of conventionally introverted kids and celebrities and explain how introverts normally react in these settings and problems that can arise. The emphasis, however, is on self-acceptance and the recognition of introverts' secret strengths, such as listening, reflection, and focus. Playful spot illustrations and comic panels will help Cain's advice connect with young readers, and each chapter ends with practical tips to empower introverts. The most notable chapter is on quiet leadership and how introverts make great, and possibly even better, leaders. Concluding guides for parents and educators help adults understand the introverts they are raising. For kids who want to roaron the inside.(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 2016, American Library Association.)

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    Penguin Young Readers Group
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The Secret Strengths of Introverts
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