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Paper Towns
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Paper Towns
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From the #1 bestselling author of The Fault in Our Stars Winner of the Edgar Award for Best Young Adult Mystery New York Times bestseller USA Today bestseller Publishers Weekly bestseller When Margo...
From the #1 bestselling author of The Fault in Our Stars Winner of the Edgar Award for Best Young Adult Mystery New York Times bestseller USA Today bestseller Publishers Weekly bestseller When Margo...
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Description-

  • From the #1 bestselling author of The Fault in Our Stars

    Winner of the Edgar Award for Best Young Adult Mystery
    New York Times bestseller
    USA Today bestseller
    Publishers Weekly bestseller
    When Margo Roth Spiegelman beckons Quentin Jacobsen in the middle of the night—dressed like a ninja and plotting an ingenious campaign of revenge—he follows her. Margo's always planned extravagantly, and, until now, she's always planned solo. After a lifetime of loving Margo from afar, things are finally looking up for Q . . . until day breaks and she has vanished. Always an enigma, Margo has now become a mystery. But there are clues. And they're for Q.

    Printz Medalist John Green returns with the trademark brilliant wit and heart-stopping emotional honesty that have inspired a new generation of readers.

Excerpts-

  • From the book

    PROLOGUE

    The way I figure it, everyone gets a miracle. Like, I will probably never be struck by lightning, or win a Nobel Prize, or become the dictator of a small nation in the Pacific Islands, or contract terminal ear cancer, or spontaneously combust. But if you consider all the unlikely things together, at least one of them will probably happen to each of us. I could have seen it rain frogs. I could have stepped foot on Mars. I could have been eaten by a whale. I could have married the queen of England or survived months at sea. But my miracle was different. My miracle was this: out of all the houses in all the subdivisions in all of Florida, I ended up living next door to Margo Roth Spiegelman.


    Our subdivision, Jefferson Park, used to be a navy base. But then the navy didn't need it anymore, so it returned the land to the citizens of Orlando, Florida, who decided to build a massive subdivision, because that's what Florida does with land. My parents and Margo's parents ended up moving next door to one another just after the first houses were built. Margo and I were two.

    Before Jefferson Park was a Pleasantville, and before it was a navy base, it belonged to an actual Jefferson, this guy Dr. Jefferson Jefferson. Dr. Jefferson Jefferson has a school named after him in Orlando and also a large charitable foundation, but the fascinating and unbelievable-but-true thing about Dr. Jefferson Jefferson is that he was not a doctor of any kind. He was just an orange juice salesman named Jefferson Jefferson. When he became rich and powerful, he went to court, made "Jefferson" his middle name, and then changed his first name to "Dr." Capital D. Lowercase r. Period.


    So Margo and I were nine. Our parents were friends, so we would sometimes play together, biking past the cul-de-sacced streets to Jefferson Park itself, the hub of our subdivision's wheel.

    I always got very nervous whenever I heard that Margo was about to show up, on account of how she was the most fantastically gorgeous creature that God had ever created. On the morning in question, she wore white shorts and a pink T-shirt that featured a green dragon breathing a fire of orange glitter. It is difficult to explain how awesome I found this T-shirt at the time.

    Margo, as always, biked standing up, her arms locked as she leaned above the handlebars, her purple sneakers a circuitous blur. It was a steam-hot day in March. The sky was clear, but the air tasted acidic, like it might storm later.

    At the time, I fancied myself an inventor, and after we locked up our bikes and began the short walk across the park to the playground, I told Margo about an idea I had for an invention called the Ringolator. The Ringolator was a gigantic cannon that would shoot big, colored rocks into a very low orbit, giving Earth the same sort of rings that Saturn has. (I still think this would be a fine idea, but it turns out that building a cannon that can shoot boulders into a low orbit is fairly complicated.)

    I'd been in this park so many times before that it was mapped in my mind, so we were only a few steps inside when I began to sense that the world was out of order, even though I couldn't immediately figure out what was different.

    "Quentin," Margo said quietly, calmly.

    She was pointing. And then I realized what was different.

    There was a live oak a few feet ahead of us. Thick and gnarled and ancient-looking. That was not new. The playground on our right. Not new, either. But now, a guy wearing a gray suit, slumped against the trunk of the oak tree. Not moving. This was new. He was encircled by blood; a half-dried fountain of it poured out of his...

Reviews-

  • DOGO Books ashfire - SPOILERS AHEAD: Paper Towns is INCREDIBLE!! The movie is also amazing. I got to attend Night On the Towns with one of my best friends, and then, I went again with my mom and another friend. This book is HILARIOUS. There are so many amazing quotes in this book, such as "You have to get lost before you can find yourself." Q has been in love with Margo since she moved next door when they were just kids. When they were kids, they came across a man who had killed himself, and Margo wanted to investigate. They hung out a lot in those earlier years, but by the end of their senior year of high school, they were practically strangers. One night, Margo slips into Q's room and the two go on a revenge spree. But the next morning, Margo has disappeared. This is not that unusual- Margo went off quite often without telling anyone. Q could tell that this time was different. He finds several clues that make him believe that Margo wants him to go find her. He follows the clues to a rough part of the city, where he and his friends find "You will go to the paper towns, and you will never come back" spray painted on the walls. They find all the clues they can, then hit the road. They're going to drive to Agloe, New York- a paper town they had traced Margo to. The road-trip is crazy, and one of my very favorite scenes in the entire book/movie! Here it is: The group have to make a quick stop at the gas station because Ben spilled his pee all over himself and Radar. Q grabs two shirts without looking at their design... (In the movie the cashier is Ansel Elgort, so naturally I had a fangirling episode in the movie theater) Q tosses Ben the first shirt which says "World's Best Grandma" and then hands Radar the other shirt.... It had a Confederate flag on it, and the words "Heritage Not Hate" (he's African American). In the end, Q finds Margo, but she refuses to come back with him. I honestly believe that after Q leaves, Margo commits suicide, because of all the reasons and clues you'll see if you read the book. One more thing: John Green alludes to Moby Dick a lot, so keep your eyes out for that!
  • Publisher's Weekly

    September 8, 2008
    Green melds elements from his Looking for Alaska
    and An Abundance of Katherines—
    the impossibly sophisticated but unattainable girl, and a life-altering road trip—for another teen-pleasing read. Weeks before graduating from their Orlando-area high school, Quentin Jacobsen's childhood best friend, Margo, reappears in his life, specifically at his window, commanding him to take her on an all-night, score-settling spree. Quentin has loved Margo from not so afar (she lives next door), years after she ditched him for a cooler crowd. Just as suddenly, she disappears again, and the plot's considerable tension derives from Quentin's mission to find out if she's run away or committed suicide. Margo's parents, inured to her extreme behavior, wash their hands, but Quentin thinks she's left him a clue in a highlighted volume of Leaves of Grass.
    Q's sidekick, Radar, editor of a Wikipedia-like Web site, provides the most intelligent thinking and fuels many hilarious exchanges with Q. The title, which refers to unbuilt subdivisions and “copyright trap” towns that appear on maps but don't exist, unintentionally underscores the novel's weakness: both milquetoast Q and self-absorbed Margo are types, not fully dimensional characters. Readers who can get past that will enjoy the edgy journey and off-road thinking. Ages 12–up.

  • School Library Journal

    Starred review from October 1, 2008
    Gr 9 Up-Quentin Jacobsen, 17, has been in love with his next-door neighbor, Margo Roth Spiegelman, for his entire life. A leader at their Central Florida high school, she has carefully cultivated her badass image. Quentin is one of the smart kids. His parents are therapists and he is, above all things, "goddamned well adjusted." He takes a rare risk when Margo appears at his window in the middle of the night. They drive around righting wrongs via her brilliant, elaborate pranks. Then she runs away (again). He slowly uncovers the depth of her unhappiness and the vast differences between the real and imagined Margo. Florida's heat and homogeneity as depicted here are vivid and awful. Green's prose is astoundingfrom hilarious, hyperintellectual trash talk and shtick, to complex philosophizing, to devastating observation and truths. He nails itexactly how a thing feels, looks, affectspage after page. The mystery of Margoher disappearance and her personhoodis fascinating, cleverly constructed, and profoundly moving. Green builds tension through both the twists of the active plot and the gravitas of the subject. He skirts the stock coming-of-age character arcQuentin's eventual bravery is not the revelation. Instead, the teen thinks deeper and harderabout the beautiful and terrifying ways we can and cannot know those we love. Less-sophisticated readers may get lost in Quentin's copious transcendental ruminationsgive "Paper Towns" to your sharpest teens."Johanna Lewis, New York Public Library"

    Copyright 2008 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

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    Penguin Young Readers Group
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