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The Boys in the Boat (Young Readers Adaptation)
Cover of The Boys in the Boat (Young Readers Adaptation)
The Boys in the Boat (Young Readers Adaptation)
The True Story of an American Team's Epic Journey to Win Gold at the 1936 Olympics
The #1 New York Times bestseller about the Greatest Generation freshly adapted for the next generation. For readers of Unbroken, out of the depths of the Great Depression comes the astonishing tale of...
The #1 New York Times bestseller about the Greatest Generation freshly adapted for the next generation. For readers of Unbroken, out of the depths of the Great Depression comes the astonishing tale of...
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  • The #1 New York Times bestseller about the Greatest Generation freshly adapted for the next generation.

    For readers of Unbroken, out of the depths of the Great Depression comes the astonishing tale of nine working-class boys from the American West who at the 1936 Olympics showed the world what true grit really meant. With rowers who were the sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the University of Washington's eight-oar crew was never expected to defeat the elite East Coast teams, yet they did, going on to shock the world by challenging the German boat rowing for Adolf Hitler.

    At the center of the tale is Joe Rantz, a teenager without family or prospects, whose personal quest captures the spirit of his generation—the generation that would prove in the coming years that the Nazis could not prevail over American determination and optimism.

    This deeply emotional yet easily accessible young readers adaptation of the award-winning #1 New York Times bestseller features never-before-seen photographs, highly visual back matter, and an exclusive new introduction.
    From the Hardcover edition.

Excerpts-

  • From the book

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Ever since The Boys in the Boat was first published, I have been traveling around the country talking to people about the story. When I first started, I quickly noticed that most of the people in my audiences were quite old. Some of them, in fact, were old enough to remember the events at the heart of the story, even though those events took place almost eighty years ago.

    But lately something interesting has begun to happen. More and more young people have begun to show up at my book talks. Often these younger people join with the older people, coming up to the front of the room to have their books signed. Frequently they pause at the signing table just to tell me how much they enjoyed the story and what it means to them personally. It sometimes seems strange to me to have a ninety-year-old grandma and a twelve-year-old student standing next to each other in front of me at the signing table. But listening to what both groups of readers have to say about the story, I have begun to understand. Some things are timeless.

    At first glance, this may seem to be a story about a time and place that is very different from the time and place you live in. After all, the young men at the center of this story dressed very differently than you and your friends do. They talked differently. They drove cars that look now as if they belong in museums. They sang songs that sound corny to our modern ears. They thought a radio was a marvel of modern technology. They lived through world events that now seem almost like ancient history.

    But here’s the thing. The boys in the boat were just that: boys. The problems they wrestled with were the same that you and your friends likely wrestle with today: family problems, making the team, succeeding at school, fitting in with other kids, learning whom you can and can’t trust, finding a way to make some money, figuring out how you feel about the opposite sex, deciding who and what you want to be a few years down the road. Under the surface, they really weren’t all that different.

    None of that, though, is really what the young people who come up to me at book events want to talk about. What they recognize in the story—and what they want to share with me—is the sheer excitement of being young, having a goal, striving to accomplish that goal, and making it happen, just as the boys in the boat did. Sometimes they talk about their volleyball team winning the regionals. Sometimes they talk about making first violin in the school orchestra. Sometimes they talk about wanting to be the first in their family to go to college. Sometimes they talk about falling short of their goal but being inspired by the book to try again.

    It is easy for those of us who are older and count ourselves wise to forget that it is the young who most often move the world forward. It is the young who have the boundless energy, passion, optimism, courage, and idealism to try to do what we elders might say is impossible. That’s what the boys in the boat attempted to do in this story. That’s why, eighty years later at my book-signing table, old men and women come to me with tears in their eyes, proudly remembering when they were young and full of fire. And it’s why standing right next to them are young men and women with beaming faces, bearing tales of their own brave attempts at the near impossible.

    So as you read this book, I hope you will keep in mind that at its heart this is a story about growing up, about...

Reviews-

  • DOGO Books puff10nyc - 1933. The Great Depression is raging all throughout America. Banks were going bankrupt, families were being split up, and Hoover towns were everywhere. Hitler was preparing for war, and the 1936 Olympics were coming up. Throughout all of these major events however, Joe Rantz can only think of three things; money, Joyce (his girlfriend, future wife), and college. As Joe struggles to make ends meet, he joins the Washington Crew team hoping to get an athletic scholarship. Little did he know that this decision, made entirely by chance, would change his life forever. Joe joins the freshman team, along with 7 other boys Don Hume, Joseph Rantz, George E. Hunt, James B. McMillin, John G. White, Gordon B. Adam, Charles Day, Roger Morris, and the coxswain Robert G. Moch. They start off as a ragtag team, not working together, slacking off, and always being beaten by the sophomore, and varsity team. Later on however, something clicks, and they become a real team. The next thing Joe knows, he’s at the California vs. Washington game, the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Joe thinks that the Poughkeepsie Regatta is the most exciting and important race of his career. Little did he know however, that the Poughkeepsie Regatta was just the beginning… Join Joe Rantz as he conquers challenges and defies expectations, both on the water and on land; it's time to join the boys in the boat. I thought that The Boys in the Boat was a good book. For an informational book, it was very interesting, and I liked how Daniel Brown wrote the information more like a story, verus just listing facts. I also like how he mentioned Joe’s childhood and life before joining the crew team, instead of just focusing solely on the Olympics. Another thing that I liked was how Daniel Brown also included chapters about Hitler’s ideas and the Nazi’s point of view. The pictures in the book were all pretty good, and helped express the story’s idea. The epilog was also very interesting and helped conclude the story well. The thing that I disliked the most was that the main story was told only in Joe’s point of view. I thought the book would've been even better if every chapter was told in a different crew member’s point of view, not just Joe’s. However, it was nice that Daniel Brown included short lines and quotes from the other boys in the boat’s journals. Overall, the Boys in the Boat was pretty good, and I would recommend it to a friend.
  • Publisher's Weekly

    April 15, 2013
    Doughty rowers heave against hard times and Nazis in this rousing sports adventure. Brown (Under a Flaming Sky) follows the exploits of the University of Washington’s eight-man crew, whose national dynasty culminated in a gold medal at the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Brown tells it as an all-American story of humble working-class boys squaring off against a series of increasingly odious class and political foes: their West Coast rivals at Berkeley; the East Coast snobs at the Poughkeepsie championship regatta; and ultimately the German team, backed by Goebbels and his sinisterly choreographed Olympic propaganda. The narrative’s affecting center is Joe Rantz, a young every-oarsman who wrestles with the psychic wounds inflicted on him by poverty and abandonment during the Great Depression. For this nautical version of Chariots of Fire, Brown crafts an evocative, cinematic prose (“their white blades flashed above the water like the wings of sea birds flying in formation”) studded with engrossing explanations of rowing technique and strategy, exciting come-from-behind race scenes, and the requisite hymns to “mystic bands of trust and affection” forged on the water. Brown lays on the aura of embattled national aspiration good and thick, but he makes his heroes’ struggle as fascinating as the best Olympic sagas. Photos. Agent: Dorian Karchman, WME.

  • Kirkus

    July 1, 2015
    Adapting Brown's bestselling work of the same title (2013), Mone streamlines the true story of nine young men from the University of Washington who, against all odds, won the gold medal in rowing at the 1936 Olympics. The Husky Clipper was "a graceful needle of cedar and spruce," a racing shell manned by an eight-oar crew very different from their Ivy League counterparts. They were the sons of farmers, loggers, and fishermen, hardy young men fully up to the rigors of training, each committed "to being part of something larger and more powerful and more important than himself." Against the backdrop of the Great Depression and the rise of Nazi Germany, the inspiring tale of young Joe Rantz and his teammates is also about the many people who helped to make them heroes-the coaches, parents, fundraisers, girlfriends, and boat builders. Offering a model of masterful nonfiction writing, Brown expertly balances the leisurely pacing of the protagonists' back stories with the exciting race scenes, related with concrete nouns, lively verbs, and short sentences, selected and adapted for this edition by Mone. Many photographs, an easy-to-read timeline, and notes on "The Art of Rowing," complete with a diagram, add visual appeal. A fine companion to Laura Hillenbrand's Unbroken (2014), also about the 1936 Olympics and also adapted for young readers. (Nonfiction. 10-14)

    COPYRIGHT(2015) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • School Library Journal

    August 1, 2015

    Gr 4-7-This adaptation of the adult title The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics (Viking, 2013) chronicles the powerful University of Washington crew team that took the gold in Berlin. The book centers on one untrained rower, Joe Rantz, who was working his way through college. The team was guided by the determined UW coach, Al Ulbrickson, whose obstacles to success were the rival rowing team from the University of California, Berkeley, and his own inconsistent rowers. Introductions to figures such as George Pocock, the team's boat builder, are fascinating, and the photos of races and the team help to build an understanding of this unique world. The descriptions of the team's trajectory and their tense races are suspenseful, and readers will be fully invested. Rantz is a relatable underdog. However, the accounts of his struggles and triumphs come at the expense of his teammates, who are relegated to the background, existing only as sketchy, underdeveloped figures. Brown's portrayal of the Olympic games is full of thrilling details, but it's also impersonal, with little insight into the boys' thoughts, and Nazi Germany is mentioned only briefly. A "Who's Who" at the front of the book and a time line and introduction to rowing at the back are helpful and well laid out. VERDICT Those seeking an inspiring true story or a great sports tale will be pleased with this stirring work.-Marian McLeod, Convent of the Sacred Heart, Greenwich, CT

    Copyright 2015 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

  • Booklist

    Starred review from June 1, 2015
    Grades 6-9 *Starred Review* Adapted from the adult best-seller The Boys in the Boat (2013), this quietly compelling story tells of the University of Washington rowing team that competed in the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. While every race story is essentially the same, the accounts of these races are rivetingall the more so near the end of the narrative, when readers have come to know the oarsmen and their personal stories. The main focus is Joe Rantz. Sent away at age 4 to live with relatives after his mother's death, and later turned out of his father's house again at age 10, this time at his stepmother's insistence, Joe grew up working hard. He became physically strong and self-reliant, but the emotional hardship took its toll. Determined to make the rowing team in order to stay at the university, he ultimately gained much more from the experience than his initial goals of an education and economic security. The word teamwork, which can sound humdrum to kids in coaches' droning lectures, doesn't adequately describe the connection shared by the men in that boat in 1936. Illustrated with vintage photos, this moving book offers young people a vivid sense of that shared experience. A Depression-era story with timeless appeal.(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 2015, American Library Association.)

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    Penguin Young Readers Group
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The Boys in the Boat (Young Readers Adaptation)
The Boys in the Boat (Young Readers Adaptation)
The True Story of an American Team's Epic Journey to Win Gold at the 1936 Olympics
Daniel James Brown
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