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Survivor Kid
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Survivor Kid
A Practical Guide to Wilderness Survival
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Counteracting the panic and fear associated with getting lost in the wild, this handbook equips children with practical tools for overcoming adverse wilderness experiences, even if they are endured...
Counteracting the panic and fear associated with getting lost in the wild, this handbook equips children with practical tools for overcoming adverse wilderness experiences, even if they are endured...
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Description-

  • Counteracting the panic and fear associated with getting lost in the wild, this handbook equips children with practical tools for overcoming adverse wilderness experiences, even if they are endured alone. Compiled by a search-and-rescue professional, straightforward advice is offered on building shelters and fires, signaling for help, finding water and food, dealing with dangerous animals, learning how to navigate, and avoiding injuries. Practice projects are included to hone survival skills—such as starting a fire with a reflective surface, casting animal tracks, or using a treasure hunt to test navigational aptitude. Making a strong argument for danger prevention, each lesson is coupled with simple instructions and diagrams that will reassure and empower young adventurers.

Excerpts-

  • Survivor Kid

    1
    Anyone Can Get Lost (and What to Do If It Happens to You)

    Anyone can get lost or have an emergency while hunting, hiking, or playing in the wilderness. It happens to kids and adults—even experienced hunters and hikers—and occurs most often during simple day hikes or quick outings. That means that this chapter is the most important one in the book. Maybe you skipped it at first so you could read about the fun stuff—building different kinds of shelters, identifying animal tracks, or creating a solar still. (I probably would have done the same thing!) All that other stuff is important, but none of it is as crucial as what you’ll learn in this chapter. You need to read this section carefully, and you may want to talk to a parent about what you have learned.

    The most important things you can do to stay safe are actually very easy. First, tell someone where you are going, whom you’re going with, and what time you’ll be back. Adults forget to do this as often as kids do. But how are you going to be found if no one knows where you went? Rescuers could spend hours or even days looking for you in all the wrong places. So remember: the best way to make sure that you are found is to make sure that somebody knows where you might be lost.

    Another great thing you can do is to take friends along with you. Having one or more buddies along makes good sense for lots of reasons. For starters, it’s much easier to find a group of people than it is to find just one. Also, friends can help you build a shelter, collect water, and make noise so that people can find you. And being lost is less scary when you are not alone. Your buddy doesn’t even have to be a person—you can bring a dog friend with you to keep you company and keep you warm. If you are with another person or a group of people, stay together.

    Last, always carry water, food, and a survival kit. Your kit can be as simple as a water bottle and purification tablets, a lighter, a candy bar, a flashlight, toilet paper, some garbage bags, a first-aid kit, and a whistle. You can read more about more advanced survival kits in chapter 12 (p. 191).

    Just by doing these three things—letting someone know where you’re going, taking a buddy along, and having a survival kit with you—you’ll know that you’ve done the most important things you can to make sure that you’ll be found alive and well. But what is better than being found alive and well? Not getting lost in the first place, of course. So how can you help to make sure you don’t get lost? Let’s look at some of the most common reasons that people (adults as well as kids) find themselves lost in the wilderness:

    • It gets too dark to see where you’re going. It’s easy to misjudge distances or lose track of time when you are exploring and enjoying the outdoors, and activities such as day hikes and rafting trips frequently last longer than expected. Out in the wilderness, especially in the mountains, it can get dark quickly: all of a sudden, the sun disappears behind a hill and you realize you have a long way to walk in the dark to return to your camp or car. Always carry a flashlight or headlamp, as well as extra batteries, with you when you head out into the wilderness.

About the Author-

  • Denise Long is a licensed private investigator, a certified crime analyst, and a teacher of wilderness survival classes for children. A former search-and-rescue professional, she continues to train German shepherds for search-and-rescue support and pet therapy. She lives in Pollack Pines, California.

Reviews-

  • DOGO Books jamesdaniel11 - It is a book of need to know survival skills. In 3rd grade I taught a survival lesson to the class.
  • Kirkus

    April 15, 2011

    Based on her work with middle-school students, Long offers lessons on how to stay healthy and out of trouble while awaiting rescue, the same lessons taught to adults in her survival classes.

    Her matter-of-fact, no-nonsense tone will play well with young readers, and the clear writing style is appropriate to the content. The engaging guide covers everything from building shelters to avoiding pigs and javelinas. With subjects like kissing bugs, scorpions, snow blindness and "How going to the bathroom can attract bears and mountain lions," the volume invites browsing as much as studying. The information offered is sometimes obvious: "If you find yourself facing an alligator, get away from it"; sometime humorous: Raccoons will "fight with your dog, steal all your food, then climb up a tree and call you bad names in raccoon language"; and sometimes not comforting: "When alligators attack on land, they usually make one grab at you; if they miss, you are usually safe." But when survival is at stake, the more information the better, especially when leavened with some wit. An excellent bibliography will lead young readers to a host of fascinating websites, and 150 clipart-style line drawings complement the text.

    A splendid volume for young adventurers. (index not seen) (Nonfiction. 9-14)

    (COPYRIGHT (2011) KIRKUS REVIEWS/NIELSEN BUSINESS MEDIA, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.)

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A Practical Guide to Wilderness Survival
Denise Long
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