Hide Sora notification

Try Sora - the student reading app, by OverDrive

Apple App Store
Google Play Store
  Main Nav
A Game for Swallows
Cover of A Game for Swallows
A Game for Swallows
To Die, To Leave, To Return
Borrow Borrow Borrow
When Zeina was born, the civil war in Lebanon had been going on for six years, so it's just a normal part of life for her and her parents and little brother. The city of Beirut is cut in two, separated...
When Zeina was born, the civil war in Lebanon had been going on for six years, so it's just a normal part of life for her and her parents and little brother. The city of Beirut is cut in two, separated...
Available Formats-
  • Kindle Book
  • OverDrive Read
  • PDF eBook
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1

Recommended for you

 

Description-

  • When Zeina was born, the civil war in Lebanon had been going on for six years, so it's just a normal part of life for her and her parents and little brother. The city of Beirut is cut in two, separated by bricks and sandbags and threatened by snipers and shelling. East Beirut is for Christians, and West Beirut is for Muslims. When Zeina's parents don't return one afternoon from a visit to the other half of the city and the bombing grows ever closer, the neighbors in her apartment house create a world indoors for Zeina and her brother where it's comfy and safe, where they can share cooking lessons and games and gossip. Together they try to make it through a dramatic day in the one place they hoped they would always be safe—home.

 

Awards-

About the Author-

  • Zeina Abirached was born in Beirut in the middle of the civil war. She studied graphic arts in Lebanon but moved to Paris in 2004, where she attended the National School of Decorative Arts. In 2006, she published her first two graphic novels with publisher Cambourakis, Beyrouth-Catharsis and 38, Rue Youssef Semaani. Her short animated film Mouton was nominated during the fifth international film festival in Tehran. A Game For Swallows (Graphic Universe, 2012) has won numerous awards, including being named an ALA Notable Children's Book and a YALSA Great Graphic Novel for Teens. Je Me Souviens Beyrouth (I Remember Beirut), the follow-up to A Game For Swallows, was published in French by Cambourakis in 2008.

Reviews-

  • Publisher's Weekly

    August 6, 2012
    In the tradition of Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, Lebanese author-artist Abirached offers readers a memory of her childhood in war-torn Beirut. Abirached and her brother are young children, separated from their parents during a particularly violent bombing. The violence brings all the people of Abirached’s apartment complex together, however, and they spend hours together in the foyer, waiting for her parents’ return. Abirached’s b&w inks offer a stark contrast in hard, geometric patterns that make images at once abstract and fully representative of her childhood memories. The characters, despite their cartoonish nature, show a variety of emotions, and Abirached’s gift for pacing makes tense moments appropriately full of anxiety. It is as often the space she leaves empty as the drawings themselves that tell the story—and each detail offered provides insight into the horrors of growing up in a war zone. A winner for young readers and adults alike. Ages 12–up. (Sept.)■

  • School Library Journal

    September 1, 2012

    Gr 5 Up-Zeina and her younger brother are growing up in Beirut, where civil war is a part of daily life. To protect against strikes and sniper fire, the family's living space has been reduced to the relative security of their apartment foyer, where a rug hanging on the wall, depicting Moses and the Hebrews fleeing Egypt, figures predominantly as a story background. This account chronicles one day in their lives, as the siblings await their parents' return and neighbors come and spend time with them, building an island of sanctuary for the children during this time of uncertainty. Bold, graphic, black-and-white images are visually and emotionally striking. Excellent use of maps and diagrams provides reference points and enhances understanding of spatial relationships. Unique panel placement includes several sequences of horizontal strips, read as columns. Images portray elapsed time, such as repeated smoking and countdown panels, and control pacing while revealing mounting tension. Excruciating wait time is depicted with cumulative "tic" and "toc" filling successive panels. Circular images of an embracing family contrast with the stark linear images of a war-torn country. Warmth and humor of daily life is shown in baking and storytelling, and wedding-dress close-ups touchingly highlight a mother's worry over soiling the hem, masking her worry over sniper fire. This superb memoir is destined to become a classic.-Babara M. Moon, Suffolk Cooperative Library System, NY

    Copyright 2012 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

  • DOGO Books pizzagirl7 - They grandparents lived a few streets away from them so they usually get to them at the beginning nour and Sami the parents are worried about the kids because they where not home then they try reaching them on the phone but it was hard to reach people on the phone a lot of things are wrong with where they live the city is split into parts .like for religious ,non religious.(and not just in religious groups I just don't remember all of the group's )i didn't really like this book it wasn't really my taste of books.but I recommend to 12+ and I rate this book 1/5 stars 😁 😁 -Pizzagirl7 😁 😁
  • Booklist

    August 1, 2012
    Grades 9-12 A casual browser could be forgiven for picking up this graphic novel and not realizing it wasn't Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis (2003) until a fair way in. With its childlike visual stylization and stark black-and-white forms depicting the life of a young girl in a Middle Eastern country at war, this screams out for comparison to Satrapi's classic. However, while Persepolis examined the political and religious ramifications on a nation through the life of one growing child, Abirached's tale focuses tightly on people and their deep ties to one another as neighbors gather in the Beirut apartment of Zeina and her little brother while they await their parents' return from across a city under siege. As she puts an accessible face on a foreign culture through her characters, Abirached also distinguishes her piece with striking and unique design work. Her use of heavily contrasted black-and-white spaces, as well as elegant flourishes like crowding an anxious room with ticks and tocks, suggests an impressive new talent following in the footsteps of an established master.(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 2012, American Library Association.)

  • The New York Times Book Review "It is hard not to think of Marjane Satrapi's groundbreaking graphic memoir, 'Persepolis,' while reading Zeina Abirached's moving account of her childhood in Lebanon in the 1980s. Both women write about their childhoods in the Middle East. Both write about their families. Even the two books' illustrations, black-and-white, geometric and highly stylized, have a similar feel: the images of women with almond-shaped eyes and prominent beauty marks, surrounded by heavy whirls of cigarette smoke.
    And like Satrapi, Abirached approaches her personal story ambitiously, weaving the stories of her family members and their circle of neighbors and acquaintances into a tapestry of everyday life in war-torn East Beirut. Their tales are fascinating, and often brutal in their details.
    Abirached's own story takes place on an afternoon in 1984. Abirached is a little girl, and her parents have left to visit her grandmother Annie, who lives a few blocks away. It is just an ordinary family visit. But the city is at war, and a sniper is positioned between the two homes. Abirached and her brother stay home, anxiously awaiting their parents' return. During the course of the afternoon, neighbors come and go, and with them, relate their experiences, which provide digressions from the main narrative.Life in 1980s Beirut is treacherous. There is the constant threat of artillery, random shootings and planned assassinations. The apartment Abirached lives in no longer has running water or electricity. The chandelier in a neighbor's apartment hangs close to the ground, rattling with each detonation. The children tell stories and make up games in the cramped foyer, taking breaks to eavesdrop on adult conversation.
    'A Game for Swallows' lacks the intimacy and narrative propulsion of Satrapi's masterpiece. Less a story than a portrait of a family and a city and a culture under siege, the narrative unfolds somewhat disjointedly, intentionally perhaps — as a means of conveying the haphazard and precarious nature of life in a city beset by civil war. Characters appear and disappear, sometimes without sufficient introduction, and with so many flashbacks breaking up the story line it's hard not to get lost in places.
    Yet the afternoon of waiting for the parents' return remains grimly tense (a scene in which the family and neighbors call out 'Incoming!' and 'Outgoing!' in response to the explosions outside is terrifyingly real, with the characters faces falling slack during moments of silence and panicked when the bombs explode). The profound dislocation of living in a war zone is palpable on every page. And an ominous question hangs over it all: Will Abirached's parents return? And if they do, what exactly will they be returning to?
    The book's strengths are myriad. Abirached is a lovely artist, and her characters' faces are remarkably expressive. There is much humor, a welcome relief from the chaos and heartache of the human stories within.
    For young readers, 'A Game for Swallows' will come as a revelation. At a time when the Middle East is still in turmoil and when Americans have suffered losses of electricity and other necessities during recent storms and floods, this is a story that will hit home even as it causes young, impressionable eyes to look at life abroad." —The New York Times

Title Information+

  • Publisher
    Lerner Publishing Group
  • Kindle Book
    Release date:
  • OverDrive Read
    Release date:
  • PDF eBook
    Release date:

Digital Rights Information+

  • Copyright Protection (DRM) required by the Publisher may be applied to this title to limit or prohibit printing or copying. File sharing or redistribution is prohibited. Your rights to access this material expire at the end of the lending period. Please see Important Notice about Copyrighted Materials for terms applicable to this content.

You've reached your checkout limit.

Visit your Checkouts page to manage your titles.

Close

You already have this title checked out.

Want to go to your Checkouts?

Close

Recommendation Limit Reached.

You have reached the maximum number of titles you are allowed to recommend at this time. You can recommend up to 99 titles every 1 days.

Close

Sign in to recommend this title.

Recommend this title for your digital library.

Close

Enhanced Details:

Close
Close

Limited availability

Availability can change throughout the month based on the library's budget.

is available for days.

Once playback starts, you have hours to view the title.

Close

Permissions

Close

There are no copies of this issue left to borrow. Please try to borrow this title again when a new issue is released.

Close

The OverDrive Read format of this eBook has professional narration that plays while you read in your browser. Learn more here.

Close

Holds

Total holds:


Close

Restricted

Some format options have been disabled. You may see additional download options outside of this network.

Close

MP3 audiobooks are only supported on macOS 10.6 (Snow Leopard) through 10.14 (Mojave). Learn more about MP3 audiobook support on Macs.

Close

Please update to the latest version of the OverDrive app to stream videos.

Close

You've reached your library's checkout limit for digital titles.

To make room for more checkouts, you may be able to return titles from your Checkouts page.

Close

Excessive Checkout Limit Reached.

There have been too many titles checked out and returned by your account within a short period of time.

Try again in several days. If you are still not able to check out titles after 7 days, please contact Support.

Close

You have already checked out this title. To access it, return to your Checkouts page.

Close

This title is not available for your card type. If you think this is an error contact support.

Close

An unexpected error has occurred.

If this problem persists, please contact support.

Close

Close

NOTE: Barnes and Noble® may change this list of devices at any time.

Close
Recommend this title for your digital library
A Game for Swallows
A Game for Swallows
To Die, To Leave, To Return
Zeina Abirached
Optional:
Close
Buy it now
and support our digital library!
A Game for Swallows
A Game for Swallows
To Die, To Leave, To Return
Zeina Abirached
A portion of your purchase goes to support your digital library.
Close
Barnes & Noble Sign In |   Sign In

The first time you select “Send to NOOK,” you will be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

You can read periodicals on any NOOK tablet or in the free NOOK reading app for iOS, Android or Windows 8.

Accept to ContinueCancel

Sora Turbo
Get the app!
Apple App Store
Google Play Store
Brought to you by SW BOCES School Library System, and built with 💕 by OverDrive.
Close

Renewing this title won't extend your lending period. Instead, it will let you borrow the title again immediately after your first lending period expires.

Close

You can't renew this title because there are holds on it. However, you can join the holds list and be notified when it becomes available for you to borrow again.

Close